How to Play Craps?

How to Play Craps?

January 20, 2019 Off By Kurt Jordan

Where there is noise, there is craps. This exciting, energetic dice rolling usually draws the attention of many casino and online casino regulars and visitors alike. Wagers are placed on certain number combinations being displayed when two dice are rolled and come to rest. The craps tables usually draw the attention of many casino games and visitors alike.

Object of Craps
Appearances aside, the object of craps is really quite simple. As the shooter (the person rolling the dice), you win if the first roll is a 7 or 11. If you roll a 2, 3, or 12, you “crap out,” or lose automatically. If you roll any other number-4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10-you keep rolling the dice until you roll that number again, which is called the “pass-1ine point.” When this happens, your goal is to avoid rolling a 7 on your next rolls; to win, you have to match the pass-line point before 7 comes up. So, for example, if your first roll is a 5, you keep rolling until you hit a 5 again; if you roll a 7 before a 5 comes, you lose. The other players around the table bet either that you will match your pass-line point or that you won’t. Usually, perhaps because of the party atmosphere around the craps table, other players will bet with the shooter; it’s considered bad form to “disrupt the vibes” by betting against the shooter, particularly if he or she is on a hot streak.

How to play craps
Typically, there are four casino staff members at a craps table: the boxman, who is responsible for overseeing the game and resolving disputes; two dealers, one for each side of the table, who take care of the bets; and the stickman, who delivers the dice to the shooter and announces rolls and betting options. Players take turns acting as the shooter, but you are free to pass the dice if you don’t want to shoot. The stickman usually offers the shooter five dice, and the shooter picks out two to play with. The first roll is called the “come-out” roll, and the result of this roll determines what happens next. If the shooter rolls a 7 or 11, she-and those who bet with the shooter-wins even money and the next roll effectively begins a new round of play.
If the come-out roll is a 2, 3, or 12, the shooter-and, again, those who bet with the shooter-loses, and the dice are passed along to the next player.
If the come-out roll is a “point”-that is, a 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10-then players bet on whether the shooter will roll that point again before rolling a 7. The shooter continues to roll until either the point is made or a 7 comes up. If the point is made, the shooter can continue rolling, trying to make the point again, or he can relinquish the dice to a new shooter. A plastic disk called a “puck,” with one black side and one white side, is used to keep track of the game. When the black side is up, that signifies that the current throw is a come-out roll. When a point is established on a roll, the puck is flipped white side up and placed on the numbered box corresponding to the point.

Pass-Line and Don’t Pass Bets
These bets are the most common and are placed before the shooter makes his or her first roll. With a pass-line bet, you’re Wagering on two possibilities: first, that the shooter will roll a 7 or 11 on the first throw., or second, that the shooter will roll a point Q4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10) and will repeat that point before rolling a 7. You lose if the first roll is a 2, 3, or 12. Most casinos pay even money on a pass-line bet. The don’t-pass bet is the opposite of the pass-line bet. In this case, you’re wagering that the shooter will either crap out on the first roll (that is, throw a 2, 3, or 12) or, if the shooter rolls a point on the first roll, that he or she will roil a 7 before repeating the point. You lose if the first roll is a 7 or 11.

Come and Don’t Come Bets
Come and don’t-come bets are the same as pass-line/don’t-pass bets, except that they are made after the shooter makes his or her first throw and establishes a point. With a come bet, you’re wagering that the shooter will repeat a point before rolling a 7; with a don’t-come bet, you’re wagering that the shooter will roll a 7 first. On a come bet, you win even money if the next throw is a 7 or 11. You lose if the throw is a 2, 3, or 12. If the throw is any other number, that number becomes the point for your come bet, and your chips are moved to the numbered box corresponding to your point. If the point is repeated before a 7 is rolled, you win. 1f a 7 shows up first, you lose. The don’t-come bet is the opposite, and it’s much less popular than the come bet. On this bet, you win even money if the next throw is a 2 or 3; a 12 is a push, or tie. You win on this bet if a 7 is rolled before the point is repeated, and you lose if the point is repeated first.